The Great Tenacity of German War Bride Liane Hoffman
  • The Great Tenacity of German War Bride Liane Hoffman

    Liane (Leona) Hoffmann Wagner, who came to Round Top, Texas, as a German war bride in 1947, left her native land to marry a young American World War II veteran. At the age of 95, she still is a feisty woman whose ambitions are to go gambling in Louisiana this summer with her caregiver, Scotty, and live to be at least 100. Photo by Elaine Thomas

  • Although Liane Hoffmann liked the looks of the young American soldier at the Stork Club in Berlin in 1946, she was embarrassed that he heard her say so. By the time she reached Texas as a war bride, Liane’s name on official documents had appeared as Lione, Liona, Liono, Lia and Liane. The scrutiny of her immigration papers was haphazard to say the least.

    Although Liane Hoffmann liked the looks of the young American soldier at the Stork Club in Berlin in 1946, she was embarrassed that he heard her say so. By the time she reached Texas as a war bride, Liane’s name on official documents had appeared as Lione, Liona, Liono, Lia and Liane. The scrutiny of her immigration papers was haphazard to say the least.

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  • Liane and her brother, Monfred, grew up during Hitler’s rise to power in Germany and survived multiple bombings of Berlin and other World War II bloodsheds. At the end of the war, Liane made her way to a Russian prisoner of war camp to claim her brother who had been incarcerated there. He never spoke about his experiences as a prisoner. She later helped Monfred immigrate to the U.S.

    Liane and her brother, Monfred, grew up during Hitler’s rise to power in Germany and survived multiple bombings of Berlin and other World War II bloodsheds. At the end of the war, Liane made her way to a Russian prisoner of war camp to claim her brother who had been incarcerated there. He never spoke about his experiences as a prisoner. She later helped Monfred immigrate to the U.S.

  • Although Liane had no idea of how difficult life could be on a Texas farm in the late 1940s, she was glad to be part of a community where German was spoken. However, it took her longer to become fluent in English.

    Although Liane had no idea of how difficult life could be on a Texas farm in the late 1940s, she was glad to be part of a community where German was spoken. However, it took her longer to become fluent in English.

  • George Wagner was on the front row, second from right in the 1945 graduating class of Round Top-Carmine High School. The other students included (back row, left to right): Cleburne Schulze, Virginia Weikel, Howard Fuchs, Nevilie Fuchs and Alfred Wagner Jr. (Front row, left to right): Eldie Roski, Della Marie Rachui, Durwood Fuchs, Bonibell Bergmann and Eurline Weigelt. Photo courtesy of Fayette Heritage Museum & Archives.

    George Wagner was on the front row, second from right in the 1945 graduating class of Round Top-Carmine High School. The other students included (back row, left to right): Cleburne Schulze, Virginia Weikel, Howard Fuchs, Nevilie Fuchs and Alfred Wagner Jr. (Front row, left to right): Eldie Roski, Della Marie Rachui, Durwood Fuchs, Bonibell Bergmann and Eurline Weigelt. Photo courtesy of Fayette Heritage Museum & Archives.

  • Liane’s parents were anti-Hitler. When her father, Willy Hoffmann, was drafted, he reluctantly left his hospitality industry post where he trained high-end restaurant waiters and staff. He had to turn his attention to training dogs for Nazi Germany. The last time Liane saw her father was in 1945 when he took her to the train station. He told her to be careful because a uniform hid everything underneath. After being sent to the Russian front, the family never heard of him again.

    Liane’s parents were anti-Hitler. When her father, Willy Hoffmann, was drafted, he reluctantly left his hospitality industry post where he trained high-end restaurant waiters and staff. He had to turn his attention to training dogs for Nazi Germany. The last time Liane saw her father was in 1945 when he took her to the train station. He told her to be careful because a uniform hid everything underneath. After being sent to the Russian front, the family never heard of him again.

  • George Wagner, who entered the service shortly after graduating from high school, served in the U.S. Army of Occupation in the American sector of Berlin, Germany. There, he met his future wife, Liane Hoffmann.

    George Wagner, who entered the service shortly after graduating from high school, served in the U.S. Army of Occupation in the American sector of Berlin, Germany. There, he met his future wife, Liane Hoffmann.